Q3 2021 Newsletter

Carlsbad Time Lines
Q3 2021 Carlsbad, California, Historical Society


President’s Letter -Third Quarter
To paraphrase; “It’s summertime and the living is easy”.
This summer we are returning to a sense of normalcy and
our museum is open every weekend on Saturday and
Sunday from 11-3 and the same operational hours on the
first and third Friday of each month. Warm summer days
mean limited parking near Magee House and our museum,
so plan to visit early in the day. It’s a great little trip for
you and your summer visitors; we’ve got lots of interesting
new post pandemic displays.
One of our most recent exhibits features the pioneer Kelly
Family. We’ve utilized the space in our conference room to
create a unique and informative exhibit that highlights the
entire Kelly Family from early pioneering settlement in the
1860s to the current generation and their civic
contributions. Items on display are generously loaned
artifacts from the Allan O. Kelly Family, and they create a
unique opportunity for visitors to learn more about our
history beginning with the Rancho period, and continuing
to the establishment of the City of Carlsbad.
New Display for Allan Kelly’s collection
Maps and posters for the new Allan Kelly display in
the conference room.
Save the Date
Sunday, October 17, 2021 from 1-3 we will be meeting at
St. Michael’s Church Hall for our annual meeting and
election. I’ll present a brief talk on the Pioneer Kelly Family
and the museum will be open for those interested in
walking across the street and seeing the newest display.
Repairs
Carlsbad City Facilities is creating an action item checklist
of needed repairs for all historic buildings located in Magee
Park. This includes Magee House and Barn as well as the
Granary and Heritage Hall. A contractor will be visiting
each site later this summer and submitting their
recommendations. Requests for funding of repairs will be
included in the facilities budget requests to the city for
next year.
1
Magee Park and Homeless
Carlsbad PD Homeless Outreach Team is creating a
positive presence at Magee Park. Their efforts are greatly
appreciated.
Annual Election
Please submit your name if you are interested in running
for election. Positions of President, Treasurer and
Secretary for the term 2022-2024 will be voted on this
October at our annual meeting. Send your name to
cbadhistory@gmail.com
Not so Very Different
Living in urban Carlsbad in 2021 you wouldn’t expect to
have a bobcat roaming your neighborhood, eating your
house pets. But that is exactly what happened in my
neighborhood in July. Drought, pandemic, global warming
or encroachment on natural habitat could all be
contributing factors to the recent arrival of bobcats living
among us. John L. Kelly, the son of Matthew Kelly the Los
Kiotes homesteader, and nephew of Robert Kelly the
owner of the Rancho Agua Hedionda wrote in his memoirs
“Life on a San Diego Ranch” about his encounter with one
particular bobcat . Copies of this bound book are available
for checkout at the Carlsbad Library, and of course
members are welcome to borrow one of our copies.
Here’s the excerpt as written by John L.
“One very foggy morning, I was letting my flock of sheep
and goats feed along through the bushes on a hillside,
when suddenly I saw only a few yards ahead of me a large
bobcat wrestling with a half-grown goat, and trying to drag
down. I had my double- barreled shotgun with the one
barrel loaded with thirty-six caliber pistol bullets, and the
other barrel loaded with number seven shot for quail or
rabbits. Instead of shooting at once as I suppose I should
have done, which would have probably killed both goat
and wildcat, I rushed in shouting at it, but with my gun
ready to shoot it the instant it separated itself from the
goat. At about this stage of the game, however, Leach
rushed past me and leaped onto the cat. Before I had
been afraid to shoot for fear of killing the goat, and now I
could not shoot for fear of killing my faithful little dog.
The big wildcat was far bigger than Leach, but what has
size got to do with it when a Scotch terrier sees a prospect
for a fight? All I could see was a rolling mass of dog and
wildcat clinched in a deadly combat and before I could do
anything they were rolling down the steep hillside under
some thick brush. I thought the big wildcat would surely
kill him. By the time I got down to where I could see the
fight again, the wildcat had evidently had all the fight he
wanted for just then he managed to break loose and
dashed away down the hill with Leach in hot pursuit.”
Former Carlsbad Resident; Murph the Surf- Heist
Mastermind
Break in at the NYC American Museum of Natural
History
In October 1964, the “Star of India”, a 563 carat oval blue
sapphire larger than a golf ball was stolen from the New
York City American Museum of Natural History, as was a
100.32 carat “DeLong Star Ruby” and a 116 carat
“Midnight Star” black sapphire. This was the largest jewel
theft in NYC history. And the theft was pulled off by a
former Carlsbad resident, Jack Murphy and two of his
criminal cohorts Allan Kuhn and Roger Clark.
Born in Los Angeles, Jack Murphy, an only child, spent his
childhood in Carlsbad. His family left town in the 1940s
and moved to many other states before he eventually
ended up in Florida.
At 27 years of age Jack “Murph the Surf “ was living in
Miami listed as a surfing champion in Florida and a Cocoa
Beach surf shop owner, he and 2 friends also were thieves
pulling off waterfront mansion robberies and escaping by
speed boat.
After they stole the Star of India and 22 other gems, on
October 29, they returned to Florida and hid the gems
2
underneath the boat. Two days later the police were
tipped off and they were captured. A movie titled “ Murph
the Surf” was released in 1975 and provides a glamorized
version of the theft.
Jack Murphy, “Murph the Surf” served two years jail time
for the gem theft, and later returned to prison for several
decades after being convicted for a brutal homicide in
Miami.
“Star of India” sapphire
“Jack “Murf the Surf” Murphy sits in an outdoor lounge
chair with his dog on his lap as he reads a Woody
Woodpecker comic book. Inscribed on the bottom border
of the print; “Jack Murphy 8-1948. Later in life Murphy
gained the nickname “Murf the Surf” as a professional
surfer, and infamy as a jewel thief and convicted criminal,
with his participation in “The Greatest Jewel Heist of the
20th Century” serving as the inspiration for the 1976
motion picture “Murph the Surf”.” Photo from Carlsbad
Local History Collection Archives
KELLY RANCH FAMILY
MUSINGS, MEMORIES, REFLECTIONS FROM
SON-IN-LAW MARVIN SIPPEL –LATER “ OUTLAW”
In 1956 I married into the Allan and Katherine Kelly
family which included daughter Lucia and son Wm. Allan.
Allan was a cattle rancher, author and Katherine was a
former school teacher at Pine School in Carlsbad.. Son
Allan was a student at Davis UC campus.
Lucia and I met at Whittier College in January, 1954. She
had returned to WC after spending a semester at UC
Davis. She worked at the Campus Inn as a door checker
where students ate. Before leaving for summer break I
mused to myself that I will plan to date her in Sept. Our
first date was attending the football game at Hadley
Field and we began dating regularly thereafter.
We got pinned in January of our senior year, engaged in
June after graduation and married in July 1956. I had
been drafted into the army just at the end of the Korean
War serving at Fitzsimons Army Hospital in Denver, CO. I
worked with psychiatric patients there. We married
midway through my commitment and settled into our apt
in Denver .. Lucia taught elementary school.
After graduate school receiving my teaching credentials
and MA degree, we moved to Escondido where I taught
middle school physical education for 6 years. Our oldest
son, Doug, was born in 1959, and in 1961 we moved
into the old ranch house which Lucia’s parents had built
in 1920.s. They later built a Weir Brothers adobe in

  1. so their older house was vacant. It was single wall
    construction (no insulation) and had a fireplace and oil
    burner heater. One could see some light between the
    boards. It was located on a dirt road ½ mile from
    two-lane El Camino Real. Water was piped about one
    mile from Holly Berry Spring . It had a sulfur odor and
    taste. Hence, we got town bottled water for drinking. At
    3
    times the filter for the water line got clogged with small
    frogs which required cleaning regularly. It wasn’t fancy
    living but the rent was cheap and we saved money to
    build a new home.
    In winter we had to ford the creek which had running
    water after a storm. I put railroad ties in my pickup truck
    bed for better traction. Rural life location included many
    critters: coyotes, bobcats, rabbits, snakes, skunks and
    many sundry others. A rattle snake was found under my
    baby son’s crib, and a skunk hid in a drawer in the stove.
    Many similar kinds of experiences occurred. Bobcats
    raided the chicken coop. Life in the country was eventful.
    Lucia Kelly and Marvin Sippel
    In 1964 we built our new home on 2 acres given to us
    by Lucia’s parents. My father in law and I bought 25
    head of Hereford cattle at the LA livestock market and
    he bought a bull named Uncle George– Once again we
    were in the cow- calf cattle business. New pasture
    fences, corral with two catch pens and loading chute
    were constructed. All were located on a dirt road later to
    become Canon Road and then extended to reach the site
    of now Sage Creek High School.
    Lucia’s brother returned from Arequipa, Peru and
    resumed farming. We electrified the old windmill with a
    new pump, planted permanent pasture, and housed our
    kid’s horses, steers, and eventually some friend’s horses.
    At one time we had about 25 head of livestock to
    accommodate which were located in pipe corrals or
    pastures. We farmed our own oat hay, bought alfalfa
    and lived as country folk at the edge of Carlsbad. City
    kids loved to come out and experience horse riding and
    such events as creek wading and “tomato throwing
    contests” when Raul Sanchez’s fields were done
    harvesting. Our six Kelly and Sippel kids had lots of city
    friends.
    Enumerated are some of the animals we had over the
    years” steers, horses, sheep, chickens, goats, dogs, cats,
    bulls, etc. In addition to the above animals I will briefly
    mention some of the experiences our families had over
    the years.
    ● foals being born; horses out at night on ECR when
    gates were left open; nightly sound of horses
    hooves on asphalt drive coming up to find
    some morsels of grain.
    ● calls from Carlsbad PD to come fetch horses again
    and again
    ● wire fences cut and animals out; cattle rustling
    with steer butchered in the field and stolen. No
    brand mark located on the hide so we couldn’t
    prosecute.
    ● Trash of all types dumped on property needing
    clean up
    ● Mailbox vandalized by one of my former high
    school students who didn’t graduate. Later kittens
    in the mailbox.
    ● Brush fires needing fire dept. assistance . (
    note;) during mowing weeds I accidentally started
    a fire requiring 2 helicopters and a dozen fire units
    to quell the fire)
    ● Flooding after deluge rainfall with benches and
    debris from Rancho Carlsbad Mobile Home Park.
    Our fences were wiped out with animals stranded
    on isles of land. The park was up-stream from our
    ranch. I remember the sound of roaring water all
    night long as it passed under the highway bridge
    on ECR. Agua Hedionda stream was a massive
    flood.
    ● Numerous birthday parties for our kids and their
    friends
    ● Hay rides pulled by our tractor starting at the Irwin
    Kelly barn on ECR.
    ● Beautiful spring wild flowers after a wet rainy
    season.
    ● Kelly family and Rotary club barbecues under the
    euc. trees.
    ● Our kids climbing into an old tractor tire and
    rolling downhill bumping into a haystack.
    Then watching Uncle Ning do the same but with
    greater speed.
    4
    ● Driving the WWII Recon truck with a flat bed to
    haul hay from the fields and stacked in Kelly Barn.
    ● Acquiring a surplus military (mule) 4WH drive .
    One time our six kids drove it, tipped over, and
    rescued Susan Kelly from the water. We adults
    heard the story years later.
    ● Another time Susan was bitten by a rattler and GF
    Kelly used his pocket knife to treat here. She
    later was hospitalized. More examples could be
    mentioned.
    Choose and Cut Christmas tree business: Having lots of
    land also had its tax problems. In the late sixties, the
    land was assessed as future homes and taxes increased
    by $300 per acre. As a result, to pay taxes we began an
    18 year business of selling trees to satisfied customers.
    Many remember coming early the Friday after
    Thanksgiving to select, tag and reserve a tree for later
    cutting. The old timers tell us their experiences still now.
    We had Ken Youngdale’s Kelly School MGM classes and
    parents help over several years replant for a pay of $1
    per tree. This produced loyal future customers.
    Katherine and Allan Oscar
    The senior Kellys were a unique couple. Katherine was a
    master gardener, great cook,and helped raise her
    grandkids, as well as volunteering in many places.
    Besides ranching, Allan wrote on numerous subjects, in
    particular the subject of Impact Geology. He was Citizen
    of Year several times and a lifetime Rotarian.
    Lastly, how Marvin temporarily was an outlaw from the
    family.
    Son Wm. Allan served on the Carlsbad Unified School
    Board Many years. One year the Teacher Union had a
    dispute with the board regarding salaries and other
    matters. As a teacher I did not support his re-election. In
    a short time we “Mended our fences” and moved on with
    our lives.
    Marrying into the Kelly family has been a truly wonderful,
    loving life which I wouldn’t exchange. Rich experiences
    and unique people.
    New Life Members
    Sondra Curtin-Ttee
    Joan Langen Fessenden
    ~~~
    CHS BOARD OF DIRECTORS
    President: Susan Schnebelen Gutierrez
    1st Vice President: Kenneth Langen
    2nd Vice President: Marvin Sippel
    Secretary: Ginny Unanue
    Treasurer: Germán Gutierrez
    Carlsbad Historical Society
    P.O. Box 252 Carlsbad CA 92018-0252
    (760) 434-9189
    cbadhistory@gmail.com
    Shipley-Magee House
    258 Beech Avenue Carlsbad CA 92008
    Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday 11 to 3 pm
    Private Tours with Tea are given Monday through Thursday BY
    APPOINTMENT ONLY
    http://www.carlsbadhistoricalsociety.com
    5
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Q2 2021 Newsletter

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Q1 2021 Newletter

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Newsletter Q4 2020


President’s Letter


This is the last newsletter of the year, and who would have
guessed what a year 2020 has been! Included in our 4 th
Quarter newsletter you will find three letters from members
on how this Covid 19 pandemic has impacted their lives.
Please consider sharing your own experiences to be
included in our archival records.
After more than 60 years our Carlsbad landmark power
plant is in the dismantling process. You’ll see a few photos
and we hope to continue sharing photos of this historic
process in future newsletters.
With our museum closed since March, our docent has had
the time to scan thousands of negatives from the defunct
Oceanside Blade Citizen newspaper. These photo negatives
covered news stories that were reported during the 1980s.
Lots of treasures were found, such as the time Science
Fiction author Ray Bradbury spoke at Carlsbad High School,
or Elliot Gould filming the Disney movie “The Devil and Max
Devlin” in La Costa. We are currently sharing these photos
on the Carlsbad Historical Society Facebook page.
Eliot Gould at the Carlsbad Racetrack
Some more great news, we are reopening the Carlsbad
Historical Museum on a limited basis Saturday and Sunday,
from 12:30-2: 30. We are following the San Diego County
Health Department protocols, so masks are required, and
the number of visitors is limited to 4 at one time. The
reduced hours are in response to needing time to sanitizing
the museum. Visitors will be restricted from using the
restrooms, and will follow a one way path through the
museum, entering by the Beech Street door, and exiting
through the Ocean Street side door. At this time we will not
be reopening the barn.
So spread the word among your friends and acquaintances
that we are open again to the public and check out our
photos on Facebook .
Sue


Carlsbad History Highway

The Carlsbad Historical Society is reaching out to the
general public by presenting virtual discussions on Carlsbad
history topics on the 4th Monday each month from 10–11
a.m.
Anyone can travel down Carlsbad’s History Highway from
the comfort of their own home by signing up for these
presentations hosted through the City of Carlsbad’s Virtual
Center. The presentations have been very well received and
attendance numbers are impressive. This is a great way to
share our love of Carlsbad history.
To register for these virtual programs:
• Go to http://www.carlsbadconnect.org
• On top right corner click Login/Create Account
• Adults 50+ tab from the options.
• Select the class Carlsbad History Highway.
• Once registered you will receive an email the evening
before the class is scheduled as well as one hour prior to
the start of the class.
You’ll just click on the link provided in the email to access
the discussion.

Schedule:
October – The Shipley Family and the importance of the
founding of St. Michaels
November – The Kelly Family
December – Carlsbad Tourism


Annual Meeting and Election


A new first for us, our 2020 Annual Meeting was held
virtually on Sunday, October 18 at 2 pm through a Zoom
Meeting. The 2019 Annual Meeting Minutes were read and
voted upon. Election Results were announced for the
2021-2023 term beginning January 2021. The Officers
elected were: Susan Gutierrez, President; Germán
Gutierrez, Treasurer; Virginia Unanue, Secretary.


From the Archives
John Aldridge Frazier- 1833-1899


Frazier discoverer of the Carlsbad Mineral Water Well
John Frazier was born in Rhode Island, and was a twin to
Elizabeth Frazier. He came from a seafaring family and
embarked on his own nautical travels at the age of 13 when
he shipped out with his uncle. He served for about 14 years
at sea, and ended his career in 1860 when he arrived in San
Francisco, where he married. Frazier spent a few years in
Sacramento and possibly worked in the nearby mines. By
1881, he had purchased 126 acres from homesteader
Lafayette Tunnison. He dug for and found water near the
newly laid train tracks, and the rest is history! His place
became known as Frazier’s Station but this was soon to
change when he sold his land to Gerhard Schutte, Samuel
Church Smith, Henry Nelson and Henry Wadsworth, and
they established the Carlsbad Land and Water Company.
Frazier hired on as General Manager of the newly
established hotel and health spa hotel.
In addition to Frazier’s seafaring and discovery of water, we
list his founding of the Good Samaritan Mission in Los
Angeles, prospecting for gems and minerals in east San
Diego County and serving as U.S. postmaster in Vista
California.
On the right is the Frazier Station, next the four story
Carlsbad Hotel, and on the left the Wadsworth house (the
twin of Schutte’s house, a block away)


Covid Letters


Letter to the Historical Society From Sue Ladouceur


Historically speaking, this pandemic of 2020 has been a real
challenge. But then, I just realized that the Covid-19
moniker is not the most recent virus after virus #18, but
stands for the year 2019 of which it first appeared! To say I
am behind the times is an understatement. I, personally,
would much rather be living in 2019 over again instead of
doing this 2020 in slow motion. Now all the quarantine we
so faithfully followed with no family and no direct contact
with friends is all for naught. And we have to start over now
since some didn’t take it seriously the first time. To say
some of us are slow learners is another understatement.
Oh, well, We did learn to be creative in the kitchen and
garden and Facebook for teaching us how to grow veggies.
Top off the tail of the romaine lettuce, plop it under the
earth and voila, up grows more lettuce. And I am now more
frugal. Eating up leftovers has become the goal before
penicillin enters the food chain. We have also learned to
supplement and extend 2 hotdogs by dicing them up small
and adding them to leftover noodles with a dash of katsup!
Oh, clever non-cook that I am. And my audience of onehusband
Peter, always raves about the concoction because
there is always his turn as an alternative. And fortunately,
for all who have sampled his cooking night- pickles are the
prime ingredient- better than katsup perhaps.
So, as you can see, acquiring and processing food and toilet
– paper (not to eat) has been a prime obsession in our
house. Other preoccupations are July 2020 Carlsbad
Historical Society gardening, and that means daily haircuts
of all plant life in the backyard. If the virus lasts another 6

months, we may be sporting desert décor in the backyard.
Other respites from the day, while eating lunch in the back
40 (food again) include watching butterflies, and
hummingbirds and our favorite lizards that live under the
umbrella stands. They actually came with names -Louie,
Jake #1 and Jake #2. Jake #2 does push ups to look buff.
Maybe something we should be doing, hint, hint!
Thank you technology. We have TV and cell phones and
facetime and zoom to bring news (mostly dreadful) and
family into our living room and sometimes bathroom. We
see each other making meals and art, watching movies and
Netflix. We see haircuts and weight loss, and gain, Oh,
Dear! And we get hugs and kisses from afar and that has
become enough, almost. We read, We write, We do art, We
don’t clean so much, always something more fun on the to
do list. Have yet to clean out the garage. Guilt. No, no guilt.
We are dealing with a pandemic, for heaven’s sake. Give us
some slack.
We gaze at the night sky a lot. WE grieve. We are afraid.
We hug., silently. WE have forgotten how to converse. We
must practice. We thank the gods for our neighbor friends
for months of shopping and cookie dough and avocados and
surprise hellos across the street. WE are alone but not.
Because we are all in this together. Happy or not, we must
be survivors. Finding ways to use a 5 lb. bag of carrots
before they spoil. Finding ways to not waste this precious
time. There is always peanut butter and jelly!
To all- stay safe and well
Sue R. Ladouceur


Letter from Marge Howard Jones


Four months in and all is well. I am happy at home with my
little dog, my sweet daughter just next door and constant
contact with friends and family near and far. My main
concern is the rest of the world! I miss going out to lunch
but feel sad for all the places no longer operating, not to
mention waste of food and energy. I don’t understand the
resistance to mask wearing and other precautions. I really
don’t expect our usual routines to ever return, so I wonder
if all this down time could be put to use thinking up, and
planning alternate ways of life. As a start, after cleaning
out cupboards and closets, perhaps consider what’s really
needed, as compared to what’s wanted…or vice versa!
That’s what’s keeping me buzzing..and tossing…and
re-appreciating things I forgot i even had! Carolyn
(daughter) keeps the bird feeder full and I watch those little
rascals goggle it up in less than half a day…so nature is
carrying on and we will,too.
Oh, almost forgot: the best thing in my life last week was
the streaming on Disney+ of “Hamilton”, the Broadway
musical. It is just wonderful in so many ways…and
especially timely for right now…a true gift to us all! Stay
well..


Letter from G. Gutierrez


Before the pandemic started I had been busy studying
microbiology and genetics by viewing online courses from
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). They have
some world leaders in the field. Then I switched to a course
from Columbia University, given by virologist Vincent
Racaniello. It turned out that the 2020 version of his course
was being broadcast on Youtube as the pandemic
developed. Mr. Racaniello kept updating the class on what
was happening and predicting some outcomes. It is very
complicated but one valuable lesson from studying viruses is
that it allowed scientists to better understand how cells
work. This is because a tiny DNA or RNA virus is capable of
taking control of a cell with a much larger DNA; so it had to
be using some good tricks.
Coronaviruses have a fairly large DNA, and that is bad news
because it means that they have a lot of capabilities to fight
our defenses. They also use error correction molecules
when they duplicate, but this is good news because it
means they will not mutate in bizarre ways.
Another picture from our recent scans
Stagecoach Park dedication ceremony – Can you identify any
of the people in this picture? Please email us.

Power Plant Dismantling


The Encina Power Station in Carlsbad has begun its slow
dismantling. Cranes have been removing structures from
the roof and concrete panels from the back. The front of the
plant is covered with scaffolds and shows partial
dismantling. Only two items will temporarily remain
untouched: the seawater pumps and the smokestack.
The pumps are needed to provide water to the Poseidon
Desalination plant, which sits south and east of the plant.
Replacement pumps are to be installed this year.
The 400 foot tall smokestack cannot be taken down at this
time because antennas used by the SD County Sheriff’s
Department, as well as the Carlsbad Police Department, are
mounted on it. Once a new communication system is
installed the smokestack will be gradually dismantled. There
was an effort to preserve the stack as a landmark, but this
effort has failed.
Local residents have noticed the low noise coming from the
new fast-start power plants, particularly this summer that
we had unusual heat waves, requiring more energy for air
conditioning.
The old plant was over 65 years old, having been completed
in 1954. The tall smoke stack was added in 1978 to replace
four smaller stacks. The new power plant supplies a little
over half of the power of the older plant, but turns on and
off much faster. The new plant provides a little over 500
Megawatts of power.
Panels have been removed from the back of the Power
Plant (CHS-GG)
Scaffolds on the front face of the Power Plant are used to
remove concrete panels (CHS- GG)
Five small smoke stacks are part of the new power plant
East of the old Encina Power Station (NRG Energy photo).
~~~
CHS BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President: Susan Schnebelen Gutierrez
1st Vice President: Kenneth Langen
2nd Vice President: Marvin Sippel
Secretary: Ginny Unanue
Treasurer: Germán Gutierrez
Carlsbad Historical Society
P.O. Box 252 Carlsbad CA 92018-0252
(760) 434-9189
cbadhistory@gmail.com
Shipley-Magee House
258 Beech Avenue Carlsbad CA 92008
Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday 11 to 3 pm.
Private Tours with Tea are given
Monday through Thursday
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
http://www.carlsbadhistoricalsociety.com
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CHS Members Pandemic Briefs 2020     

CHS Members Pandemic Briefs 2020

Coronavirus in Carlsbad

We have been keeping daily records of the cases of CoronaVirus 19 infections recorded in Carlsbad, over several months. The following graph shows the increase in the last month, corresponding to the “surge” that started after Memorial Day. According to the San Diego County Health Department  even though the uptick is following the Black Lives Matter demonstrations there have been no  contact tracing attributed to the protests.

Invitation to all members to submit articles for publication in our electronic “Brief”

President: Sue Gutierrez

Round one of the Covid 19  Pandemic  has now entered into our predicted surge period. It’s really not surprising as we see people all over town not adhering to suggested health guidelines of social distancing and mask wearing. As it becomes more obvious every day  that we are in this for the next few months, we are  turning to our friends and neighbors for support, friendship, inspiration,  and  yes, a humorous look at  what we are all experiencing. As our members share their experiences we’ve decided to  send them out for a little context, that at this time we really are not alone in this crazy and scary world we are living in. We can’t guarantee these Pandemic briefs will be  consistent, that really depends on what we receive from you, our membership. But we hope that you do share what you are experiencing. One of the things that we’ve really been made aware of lately, the lack of local news  journalists. It’s up to us all as Carlsbad residents, and supporters of history to make our memories  available to the future  citizens and residents of Carlsbad. We hope you will take a few  minutes and jot down some  experiences. And please enjoy Sue’s  Pandemic 2020    experiences. I laughed out loud and hope you do also.

Letter to the Historical Society From Sue Ladouceur

Historically speaking, this pandemic of 2020 has been a real challenge. But then, I just realized that the Covid-19 moniker is not the most recent virus after virus #18, but stands for the year 2019 of which it first appeared! To say I am behind the times is an understatement. I, personally, would much rather be living in 2019 over again instead of doing this 2020 in slow motion. Now all the quarantine we so faithfully followed with no family and no direct contact with friends is all for naught. And we have to start over now since some didn’t take it seriously the first time. To say some of us are slow learners is another understatement.

Oh, well, We did learn to be creative in the kitchen and garden and Facebook  for teaching us how to grow veggies. Top off the tail of the romaine lettuce, plop it under the earth and voila, up grows more lettuce. And I am now more frugal. Eating up leftovers has become the goal before penicillin enters the food chain. We have also learned to supplement and extend 2 hotdogs by dicing them up small and adding them to leftover noodles with a dash of katsup! Oh, clever non-cook that I am. And my audience of one- husband Peter, always raves about the concoction because there is always his turn as an alternative. And fortunately, for all who have sampled his cooking night- pickles are the prime ingredient- better than katsup perhaps.

So, as you can see, acquiring and processing food and toilet – paper (not to eat) has been a prime obsession in our house. Other preoccupations are gardening, and that means daily haircuts of all plant life in the backyard. If the virus lasts another 6 months, we may be sporting desert décor in the backyard. Other respites from the day, while eating lunch in the back 40 (food again)  include watching butterflies, and hummingbirds and our  favorite lizards that live under the umbrella stands. They actually came with names -Louie, Jake #1 and Jake #2.  Jake #2  does push ups to look buff. Maybe something we should be doing, hint, hint!

Thank you technology. We have TV and cell phones and facetime and zoom to bring news (mostly dreadful) and family into our living room and sometimes bathroom. We see each other making meals and art, watching movies and Netflix. We see haircuts and weight loss, and gain, Oh, Dear! And we get hugs and kisses from afar and that has become enough, almost.

We read, We write, We do art, We don’t clean so much, always something more fun on the to do list. Have yet to clean out the garage. Guilt. No, no guilt. We are dealing with a pandemic, for heaven’s sake. Give us some slack.

We gaze at the night sky a lot. WE grieve. We are afraid. We hug., silently. WE have forgotten how to converse. We must practice. We thank the gods for our neighbor friends for months of shopping and cookie dough and avocados and surprise hellos across the street. WE are alone but not. Because we are all in this together. Happy or not, we must be survivors. Finding ways to use a 5 lb. bag of carrots before they spoil.  Finding ways to not waste this precious time. There is always peanut butter and jelly!

To all- stay safe and well

Sue R. Ladouceur



Carlsbad Historical Society
P.O. Box 252
Carlsbad, CA 92018-0252
Phone: (760) 434-9189

 

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Q3 2020 Newsletter

Here is a link to our Q3 Newsletter.

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Q2 2020 Newsletter

Q2 2020 Carlsbad Historical Society

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Shipley-Magee House – Temporary Closure

 

President’s Letter

It has been a very eventful and unsettling spring. We hope that this newsletter finds you all well. Due to the world circumstances, we will not be able to print and mail out paper copies. So if you are one of those who’ve requested a paper copy, or cannot open a PDF, please let us know and we will send you a plain text of the newsletter through your email.It is during times like these that we are experiencing when we come to realize that though we are all individually impacted by world events we are also part of a larger group and the importance of community. A community that offers support to each other and respect for the overall greater benefit.

As a historical group we want to preserve for future generations of Carlsbad residents how we are individually and communally impacted by the global pandemic of Covid19. With this in mind, our organization is reaching out to you, our members, to contribute your thoughts, digital photos, art, or anything else you care to share, on how this pandemic is impacting your daily life. So please tell us your story. If you are willing, include your name, age and when you moved to Carlsbad. Let us know how you are living through this historic event. How has social distancing impacted your family? Are you making face masks, or wearing them? Are you shopping more, cooking at home, dusting off old skills of sewing, cooking, baking? Have you decided to start growing vegetables again. Do you attend church service regularly, and how has that changed? Are you reaching out to neighbors or younger family members, offering them tips on basic skills? We look forward to hearing from you. Please send anything to our gmail account: Cbadhistory@gmail.com.

The following is the second part of President Schnebelen-Gutierrez presentation given at St. Michael’s church.

Shipley Magee

Today, we are celebrating the 125th anniversary of St. Michael’s. I’d like to take a few minutes to share with you a little bit of history regarding one of the church’s founding families, the Shipleys, whose generosity and contributions helped to lay the foundation for this celebration.

Many of you may have heard of Florence Shipley Magee; whose gifts to St. Michael’s included the donation of land for the current church and the commissioning of the beautiful St. Michael’s and the Dragon stained glass window.

But, you might not have been aware that Florence Magee’s parents, Alexander and Julia Shipley were equally giving and very involved in the formation of St. Michael’s.

The Shipley’s were one of the earliest Carlsbad Families arriving in 1890. Their strong ties to England laid the groundwork for their close friendship to other local expatriate British residents, the Shaw and Ramsay families. All three families were practicing Episcopalians and, by contributing money and labor, these families became the cornerstone for creation of St. Michael’s,  Carlsbad’s first church.

The story of the Shipley Family, their background, how and why they arrived in California and their contributions to our city and to St. Michael’s really is the story of California, a family still tied to the east and yet dedicated to making a new life in the west.

Let me share a little history of Carlsbad, the significance of the Shipley family’s contributions to our community and to Saint Michael’s as benefactors and founding members.

In 1883 the Santa Fe Rail service was given permission to lay a rail line through the coastal area of Robert Kelly’s Rancho Agua Hedionda, and thus creating a direct north south rail service connecting San Diego to Los Angeles. Rail lines opened up San Diego County coastal land for development. When mineral and potable water was found along the rail line in this area by John Frasier, it created a real estate advantage. Water in a desert is a highly prized commodity, and mineral water was especially valuable. Health spas and artesian water areas were all the rage throughout the United States in the 1880s.

With water as the draw, a real estate development company was created; the Carlsbad Land and Water Company. By 1886 the Directors of the company; Gerhard Schutte, Samuel Church Smith, Henry Wadsworth and Henry Nelson purchased land nearest the rail line and subdivided it into building plots. Trees were planted, dirt roads laid out, and a four story health spa & hotel was built, all focused on the claim of artisanal water similar to that of the famous Karlsbad Spas in Europe. Three of the Directors built homes, two of which are still standing, albeit with modifications; the current Magee House across the street, the current home of the Carlsbad Historical Society, built by Samuel Church Smith, and the Sun Diego / Land and Water Company Restaurant was the former Gerhard Schutte home. However, disaster struck within four years, by 1890, in the form of a severe drought. As water became scarce, the significance of a health spa dependent on water lost its value. Scarcity of water also created issues for families dependent on work associated with the health spa hotel and well, and people left town. Those who left included three Carlsbad Land and Water Company Directors. Gerhard Schutte was the only remaining member.

Vacant property became available for purchase. It was during this real estate recession that Alexander Shipley and family arrived in Carlsbad.

Alexander Shipley was 48 years old when he first set eyes on Carlsbad. In 1890, during one of his many excursions searching for the perfect climate and health spa, the Shipley family stopped in Oceanside, rented a buggy and toured the area. Samuel Church Smith, the original owner of the currently known “Magee House” had left town and listed his property for sale.

Alexander Shipley purchased the small home near the rail line, the artisanal water well, and some surrounding land from the Carlsbad Land and Water Company. Between 1890 and 1893 the Shipley’s commuted between their Calistoga home and Carlsbad. Finally, in 1893 they sold their northern California home, and moved permanently to Carlsbad.

Alexander, Julia and Florence Shipley (with Aunt Millie) at the Shipley-Magee House Porch

Carlsbad

Once in Carlsbad, we’ve learned from Correspondence, census records, and city registries, that Alexander spent most of his time supervising his investments, traveling for business, and health, and often combining both. To say the family was well off is an understatement. The Shipley’s were the wealthiest, most educated, most well traveled and well connected family to ever come to town. Alexander did not labor as most residents, he didn’t ranch or farm. He was a businessman and intellectual. He had one separate building on his property dedicated exclusively as a library.

Julia, his wife, oversaw the running of her home. She had staff to clean, garden and take care of their horses and buggy. Julia focused her time on their daughter Florence. She traveled, joined a variety of women’s organizations, and participated in church activities. Her closest friends in Carlsbad were members of the Shaw and Ramsay families, who were British Expatriates.

Settling here in 1893, the Shipley’s found no established churches in Carlsbad. We must keep in mind that this area was mainly ranch land, and with a very diminished population living in “town”, and with limited amenities, social and intellectual pursuits. If residents wanted to attend religious services they traveled to Oceanside. The Carlsbad Community Church was not established until 1924 and St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in 1943.

The significance of the Shipley’s befriending British expatriates and joining efforts to create and establish a parish cannot be ignored or overlooked. They had money, and interest, and opportunity in creating a local Episcopalian church.

Establishing St. Michael’s pulled the community together to form a cohesive town, after so many had left due to the drought. This was a turning point in the town’s history.

Thus begins their connection to St. Michael’s.

“As a result of the advertisement campaign in England that promoted the American West, many English citizens formed expatriate communities in San Luis Rey, Carlsbad, and Encinitas.

Early Regional History

Why would the Shipley’s care about socializing with British Expatriates?

Alexander Hamilton Shipley 1843-1925

Alexander Hamilton Shipley was born in 1843 in Brooklyn, New York and was one of four children of packet ship officer Thomas Bligh Shipley and Sophia O’Connor. A packet ship was a mail ship carrying mail between ports. Thomas Bligh Shipley was born in Delaware and a member of the influential Delaware Shipleys who were involved in banking, shipping, international commerce between the United States and England, and many members of the family were civil servants for the United States government.

Sophia O’Connor was a daughter of a Royal Army Officer, born, and here the information varies by information provided on census records, either in Ireland or in the West Indies, (1860). It appears from ship records the family traveled extensively and eventually to New York in 1835.

Research indicates that the Thomas Bligh Shipley family traveled often to England and that their children, Alexander included, attended school in Liverpool where their mother Sophia had extended family. It seems that she was related to the Muspratts of Liverpool, noted chemists. (Just as a side note, Florence’s middle name was Muspratt, pointing to a close connection between the families).

When Alexander’s father, Thomas Shipley, died in 1860, his widow Sophia and their children settled permanently in New York. At this point the Delaware Shipley family, and in particular Alexander’s uncle by marriage Edward Bringhurst, began to guide and mentor Alexander in business ventures.

By 1875, Alexander was engaged in business in New Zealand. He traveled for 10 years between New Zealand, England and the United States. It was during this 10 year period that Alexander met his wife Julia Seamont, married and had a daughter, Florence, who was born in New York City in 1882. By 1885, President Cleveland appointed him as the US Vice Council to New Zealand, and shortly thereafter his health took a turn for the worse. He resigned his position and retired to Calistoga, California in 1886.

Julia Seamont Shipley 1853-1943

Julia was born in 1853 in Pennsylvania to parents listed on the census records as immigrants of France (father) and Germany (mother). The 1870 census finds no mention of her father, who perhaps died during the civil war, but does list Julia living with her mother who was remarried and with several additional children. While single, Julia applied for a passport and traveled at least once outside of the United States to Cuba.

Through letters it is shown that by 1886, Julia, daughter Florence, and Alexander’s sister Lizzie had moved west and joined Alexander in Calistoga.

Julia Seamont Shipley kept in contact with her mother and half siblings in New York and New Jersey, through letters, and encouraged their daughter Florence to establish a relationship with her grandmother through the same method.

Florence Muspratt Shipley Magee 1882-1972

Florence attended the local Carlsbad School for a very short time, and then was enrolled in Our Lady of Peace (OLP) Catholic Boarding school in San Diego. Florence graduated from OLP in 1901. Her final graduation exam books highlight her excellent education, which included chemistry, algebra, Latin, as well as history and English. As a sign of the esteem her father felt towards her education and abilities, after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, during the time Alexander traveled east to visit relatives, he left the running of his financial affairs to Florence. She was just 24, and this was 14 years before women gained suffrage or the right to vote.

In addition to her excellent academic education, Florence had outstanding creative abilities; she was a talented sketcher like her grandfather Thomas Bligh and her uncle Samuel.

For the next decade after graduation, Florence participated in local activities with her parents. She joined in amateur theatrical plays, created beautiful crochet, embroidery, tatting and beading, traveled to visit relatives on the East Coast, and friends throughout California.

Florence had a keen love for animals and was known for her horsemanship. At some point, she met her future husband Hugh Magee while out riding. Hugh’s mother, Victoria, was a descendant of two original San Diego Californio Families, the Estudillos and Pederinos, and his father was a former US Army Officer Henry Magee.

Gaining a special dispensation, as Florence was Episcopalian, and Hugh a Catholic, they were married at the Mission San Luis Rey in 1912, officiated by Father O’Keefe.

Florence and Hugh moved to his family’s ranch outside of Pala, Condor’s Nest. Florence was an active participant in the ranch, helping physically with all areas of maintaining the ranch, and contributing financially as well. Florence and Hugh had no children.

After her father’s death, in 1925, Florence continued a close relationship and care of her mother Julia, often making the 2 day horseback ride from Pala to Carlsbad. She lived at Condor’s Nest until Hugh’s death in 1941.

After her husband passed away, Florence returned to Carlsbad and lived with her aging mother, until Julia passed away in 1943.

Florence at this time was alone, no children of her own, nor siblings, but she did have close friends. For the next 30 years Florence focused on her community and church.

Florence Shipley Magee

At the time of her death in 1972, Florence’s will included bequests to her beloved cats, and other pets. Her family home was left in the care of the City of Carlsbad for use as a historic and recreational park, various friends and employees received personal donations of money, furniture, art and antiques.

So finalizing the research for this talk, I had a few last questions; why was it so important for the Shipley family to establish St. Michael’s, and how did St. Michael’s impact and influence the town of Carlsbad?

What did I know for sure; there was no reference in any letters between Alexander, Julia and her East Coast family, or Florence, regarding any religious denomination, practices or beliefs. Alexander’s Delaware family were Quakers; Julia’s parents were French and German immigrants, so most likely not Episcopalian; Florence attended a Catholic Boarding school, and married in a Catholic Church. And yet all of the family, Alexander, Julia, and even Florence as a widowed adult, all were practicing and generous members of the Episcopal church, and in particular of St. Michael’s .

We have no evidence to support why the Shipley’s chose to help establish an Episcopal church in Carlsbad. Nor do we know what religious affiliation they held before moving to town. But I have a theory based on what we do know about their life experiences.

The Shipleys had feet in two separate worlds: the old one they left behind in the East Coast, England and New Zealand; and the new one they were creating in Carlsbad. Their friendship with British expatriates, the Shaws and Ramsays, who were also Episcopalian, would have been familiar and comfortable, having lived and left a similar life. This friendship helped to create a bridge between their old life and their new one. Creation of the Episcopal parish by these families was a gift to themselves, creating a religious, cultural and social foundation. But it was also a gift to the town of Carlsbad. As the first established church and parish, it gave the town a moral compass that the community could follow, and a permanence of place that’s lasted for 125 years.

What a wonderful gift to all of us.

So does it really matter why? The fact is we are very glad they did!

 

Paleontology and Carlsbad

You might not be aware but San Diego County is a  treasure trove of paleo history. Many fossils have been found in Carlsbad, and can be found at the San Diego Natural History Museum in Balboa Park.  Here are a few photos from a recent visit.

Carlsbad Ammonites

 

The Carlsbad Ankylosaurus

 

Rainfall Records in San Diego County

 

April 2020  saw record levels of rainfall in San Diego County. We thought you might enjoy taking a look at  the rainfall records from the last 100 plus years

 

Donation

 

In early March, Dani Gosewisch, the great granddaughter of Gerhard and Bertha Schutte, sent us an email with an offer of additional donations to our museum.   In the past, Dani has been very generous in her donations to the Carlsbad Historical Society. You might remember the west bedroom bed and dresser, and the velvet covered settee and chair. All of which were owned by the Schutte Family  and used while they were living in Carlsbad.

Dani’s donations this time were equally  wonderful and add so much to our understanding of her family and their time in Carlsbad.  Some of the donations included framed family photos, water color paintings of Schutte family children, beautiful Haviland hand-painted decorative wall plates in shades of green with white flowers, and this “Hunter” style pocket watch that once belonged to  town founder Gerhard Schutte.

So  first there are really 2 parts to the watch. The case that CWC. Co and the crescent moon with the star and the separated trade on one side of the moon and underlined  word mark on the other side was only used on watch cases from the Crescent Watch Case Company between 1882-1904.

 

The watch movement was Elgin and with the serial number 1560056 was only used  in 1892. So the watch fits perfectly during the time period that Gerhard lived in Carlsbad.

The case style with the closed doors rather than open faced is called “Hunters” style.

 

Gerhard and Bertha Schutte lived in their Carlsbad home from  1886- 1906. All items of the Schutte Collection donated by their great granddaughter, Dani Gosewisch, are now on display. So be sure to visit our newest display when we reopen.

 

Gerdhard Schutte’s watch donated by Dani Gosewisch

 

California during the 1919 Pandemic

 

Although the death rates from the misnamed Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-1920 were low at about 0.5%, many people were infected. One quarter of the world population was infected, or about 500 Million people. The influenza did not originate in Spain but was named so because it was the only country in Europe that acknowledged that they had an epidemic; the countries at war did not want to expose a weakness.

 

Because an influenza virus mutates more rapidly than a coronavirus, there was a mutation during the epidemic. The virus was brought by servicemen to the USA during World War I, it mutated in America, and it was carried back to Europe, where it (re)infected more people.

 

History repeats itself. There are very similar stories of the problems authorities had with supplies and also with deciding to limit the person-to-person contact. Mayors and Governors were criticized for not responding quickly, or for being too aggressive. Another debate was whether to use a mask or not!

 

The following website is a wonderful repository of the history of the 1919 pandemic in the United States:

https://www.influenzaarchive.org/index.html

 

Here is a quote from the section on Los Angeles:

“It was mid-September 1918 when cases of influenza began appearing in the Los Angeles area. At first, the disease attacked seamen aboard a naval vessel that had arrived in the harbor. On September 28, officials at the Naval Reserve Station at Los Angeles Harbor were placed, their installation under quarantine, although they were quick to state that the move was merely precautionary, as no cases yet existed. Several days later, Army officials placed the Arcadia Balloon School under protective quarantine, prohibiting the men there from visiting nearby Pasadena and other communities without special permission. There too, officials stated that there were no cases amongst soldiers.”

 

And in the summary: “In the end, Los Angeles experienced a lower epidemic death rate than many other American cities: 494 deaths per 100,000 people. By contrast, San Francisco – which acted slowly and which relied heavily on the purported protection of gauze face masks to stop the spread of influenza – had an excess death rate of 673 per 100,000. Powers, Mayor Woodman, and the City Council could be proud of their efforts.”

 

Currently the coronavirus 2020 pandemic is averaging a 7% mortality rate worldwide (5.5%in the USA), but this should go down as the number of those infected (but showing no symptoms) is accounted for through testing.

 

~~~~~~~

Carlsbad Historical Society

P.O. Box 252 Carlsbad CA 92018-0252

(760) 434-9189

cbadhistory@gmail.com

 

Shipley-Magee House

258 Beech Avenue Carlsbad CA 92008

 

Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday 11 to 3 pm.

Private Tours with Tea are given

Monday through Thursday

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

www.carlsbadhistoricalsociety.com

 

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Carlsbad named after its water source

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Channel 10 News video on Carlsbad History

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Q1 2020 Newsletter

Q1 2020 Carlsbad Historical Society

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President’s Letter

 

Dear Members,

As each year passes and we enter a new year,  we as a historical society are motivated to actively pursue  ways and methods of preserving our local Carlsbad history. Through creation of  displays, offering informative talks to the wider community, digitizing and cataloging donated  papers and photographs, we are creating a research organization as well as a social group. At the end of last year the importance of these activities became  apparent, when we were able to participate in the 125th Anniversary celebration of St. Michael’s Church, assist researchers from many different fields pointing them to  the best resources for their work, and continue with our digitization program of our own historical documents and adding them to our website. This year we’d like to continue our efforts, and hopefully return to  interviewing many of our fellow members and local residents in the hopes of preserving their contributions to our town. In this newsletter, you will find articles from several of our board members detailing their efforts to our historic preservation efforts.  And as the year progresses we hope to see you at some of our events.

 

The Twin Inns Chicken visited St. Michael’s

 

The Shipley  Family Connection to Carlsbad and St. Michael’s Episcopal Church -Part One

Susan Schnebelen Gutierrez

 

This year St. Michael’s celebrated their  125th anniversary. I want to share with you a little bit of  history regarding one of the church’s founding families, the Shipleys, whose generosity and contributions helped to lay  the foundation for this celebration.

Many of you may have heard of Florence Shipley Magee, whose gifts to St. Michael’s  included the donation of land for the current church and the commissioning of the beautiful St. Michael and the Dragon  stained glass window.

But, you might not have been aware that Florence Magee’s parents, Alexander and Julia Shipley  were equally giving and very involved in the formation of St. Michael’s.

The Shipleys were one of the  earliest Carlsbad Families arriving in 1890. Their strong ties to England laid the  groundwork for their close friendship to other local expatriate British residents, the Shaw and Ramsay families. All three families were practicing Episcopalians, and, by  contributing money and labor, these families became the cornerstone for the creation of St. Michael’s, Carlsbad’s first church.

The story of the Shipley Family,  their background, how and why they arrived in California, and their contributions to our city and to St. Michael’s really is the story of California- a family still tied to the East and yet dedicated to making a new life in the West.

In 1883, the Santa Fe Rail service  was given permission to lay a rail line through the coastal area of  Robert Kelly’s Rancho Agua Hedionda, thus creating a direct north-south rail service  connecting San Diego to Los Angeles. Rail lines opened up San Diego County coastal land for development. And when mineral and potable  water was found along the rail line in this area by John Frasier, it created a real estate advantage. Water in a desert is a highly prized commodity, and mineral water  was especially valuable. Health spas and artesian water areas were all the rage throughout the United States in the 1880s.

With water as the draw, a real estate  development company was created, the Carlsbad Land and Water Company. By 1886 the Directors of the company; Gerhard Schutte, Samuel Church Smith, Henry Wadsworth and Henry Nelson  purchased land nearest the rail line and sub- divided it into building plots. Trees were planted , dirt roads laid out, and a four story health spa hotel was built, all focused on  the claim of artisanal water similar to that of the famous Karlsbad Spas in Europe. Three of the Directors built homes, two of which are still standing, albeit with modifications. The current Magee House on Beech St., the current home of the Carlsbad Historical Society, was built by Samuel Church Smith, and the  San Diego / Land and Water Company Restaurant was the former Gerhard Schutte home. However, disaster struck within four years, by 1890, in the form of a severe drought. As water became scarce, the significance of a health spa dependent on water lost its value. Scarcity of water also created issues for families dependent on work associated with the health spa hotel and well, and people left town. Those who left included three Carlsbad Land and Water Company  Directors. Gerhard Schutte was the only remaining member.

Vacant property became available for purchase. It was during this  real estate recession that Alexander Shipley and family arrived in Carlsbad.

Alexander Shipley was 48 years old when he first set eyes on Carlsbad. In 1890, during  one of his many excursions searching for the perfect climate and health spa, the Shipley family   stopped in Oceanside, rented a buggy, and toured the area. Samuel Church Smith, the original owner of the currently known “Magee House,” had left town and  listed his property for sale.

Alexander Shipley purchased the  small home near the rail line and the artisanal water well and some surrounding land from the Carlsbad Land and Water Company. Between 1890 and 1893, the Shipley’s  commuted between their Calistoga home and Carlsbad. Finally, in 1893 they sold their northern California home, and moved permanently to Carlsbad.

Once in Carlsbad, we’ve learned from correspondence, census records, and city registries, that Alexander spent most of his time supervising his investments, traveling for business and health, and often combining both. To say the family was well off is an understatement.   The Shipley’s were the wealthiest, most educated, most well traveled and well connected family to ever come to town. Alexander, did not labor as most residents. He didn’t ranch or farm. He was a businessman and intellectual. He had one separate building on his property dedicated exclusively as a library.

Julia, his wife, oversaw the running of her home. She had staff to clean, garden, and take care of their horses and buggy.   Julia focused her time on their daughter Florence, traveling, joining a variety of women’s organizations, and participating in church activities.  Her closest friends in Carlsbad were members of the Shaw and Ramsay families, who were British Expatriates.

Settling here in 1893 the Shipley’s found  no established churches in Carlsbad. We must keep in mind that  this area was mainly ranch land, and with a very diminished population living in “town”,  and with limited amenities, social and intellectual pursuits. If residents wanted to attend religious services, they traveled to Oceanside. The Carlsbad Community Church was not established until 1924 and St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in 1943.

The significance of the Shipley’s befriending British  expatriates, and joining efforts to create and establish a parish cannot be ignored or overlooked.  They had money, and interest, and opportunity in creating a local Episcopalian church.

Establishing   St. Michael’s pulled  the community together to form a cohesive town, after so many had left due to the drought. This was a turning point in the town’s history.

 

To be continued…

 

Joan Langen Fessenden

 

Our Annual Meeting                                                                                               Ken Langen

 

On October 27, 2019, our annual meeting was held at the Langen Family home on Carlsbad Boulevard, Old Highway 101. Around 40 members enjoyed a brief talk, toured the home, and were treated to music by Dave Kirkman, Patti Langen, and Janie Rossall. Ice cream and refreshments were served. The 1954 coastal mural (16’ X 8’ oil on canvas) of Carlsbad was on display.  Our featured speaker was Joan Langen Fessenden, the oldest of seven children of Ray and Rose Rita Langen. Her talk traversed the 1925 bungalow house’s history with her family’s timeline, from Minnesota to California and beyond. She spoke of family roots in the Mississippi River Valley of Minnesota, of the decision to move West for her father’s health, and of the purchase of the home in 1953 for $9,500.00. She finished with a tribute to her parents, an update on her siblings, and an explanation of the use of this heritage home. The historical society is grateful to the Langens for sharing their home, history, and hospitality.

 

Clementine (Tina) Woster Colling

 

Tina Colling Passing

 

One of our longtime  and much loved members passed away in December of 2019. Tina will be missed by family and friends and remembered with much  fondness and admiration. In addition to the Carlsbad Historical Society, Tina was an active and participating member of the Carlsbad Community Church and  a docent at the Guajome Historic Adobe. Tina was originally from Plattsmouth, Nebraska, and there met her future husband Jerry when he was in pre-medical school at the University of Nebraska in Omaha. They were blessed with 67 years of married life. Together they moved to California when Jerry was in the Navy and later set up a medical practice. They originally bought a house in Terramar and then had a dream  home built in the adobe style in Old Carlsbad. Together they have five children: four sons, and one daughter; eleven grandkids; eleven great-grandkids; and two great-great grandkids.

 

St Michael’s old church

 

QUASQUICENTENNIAL

By Ginny Unanue

 

That is the term for a 125th anniversary.  In 2019, St. Michael’s by-the-Sea in Carlsbad celebrated this.  The church was the first one in Carlsbad, and for a number of years, the only church.  It was originally located on Carlsbad Blvd., across from Norte Restaurant, where the

7-11 mini mall is now.

 

Built in 1894, it was built by Fred Ramsey, and his two brothers-in-law, of the Shaw family.  It was built of redwood, which is anathema to insects, which is one of the reasons the original church is still standing, now serving as a chapel.  Funding was provided by a visitor from England, who after traveling from Carlsbad to north of Oceanside to the only existing north county Episcopal church, All Saints’ Church, stated that Carlsbad needed its own church, and donated the munificent sum of $500.

 

The original church was moved in 1958-59 to its new location, 2558 Carlsbad Blvd., where a new and larger church was built.  Florence Magee donated that property to St. Michael’s to build the new church.

 

The celebration of the anniversary was attended by Mayor Matt Hall, reading a Proclamation from the city, and several neighboring venues of the church, including a representative of Carlsbad By The Sea retirement community, and the head of the Army & Navy Academy, and the Bishop of the Episcopal diocese of San Diego

 

The Carlsbad Historical Society gave a presentation on Carlsbad history and the early church fathers, including the Shipleys (Florence Magee’s parents).  Susan Gutierrez, the Society’s President and resident acknowledged local history expert, showed a Powerpoint slide program she had prepared and gave the accompanying explanation of this early history.

 

The Shipley Buggy at St. Michael’s Garden

 

Digitization Program

 

It is hard to get away from the wave of digitization taking place everywhere. We have started scanning a lot of our files and making them available to the public, or restricted to our members, and more restricted to our staff. Placing documents and photographs on-line has multiple advantages: security, so they will not get lost due to acts of God; access, so anyone can reach them anywhere in the world; ease, because searching with electronic tools is much faster; and also advertisement, since Google robots will read our documents and present them to search engines.

 

Mostly we have scanned documents at the Carlsbad Libraries. Their printer/copiers have a scanning mode that writes the results to a thumb drive. The scan of double- sided color documents is fast, since the document feeder works very well. Later the output files in PDF format can  be organized and compiled using free tools on the Internet.

 

We started digitizing most of the collection of books and papers from Allan O. Kelly, and we have a separate tab on our website for him. Oral histories, that had been done in collaboration with the Carlsbad Library, have been scanned and uploaded to a members-only section (“secure”). Oral Histories of Oceanside have also been added. The complete Historic Resource Inventory, which dates to 1990 is available online; this is a street by street description of the homes in Carlsbad, including property details, maps, and sometimes aerial photographs.

 

Recently Newsletters from our organization, going back to 1983, have scanned and added to our website. Minutes and finance reports are available to Board Members, electronically too.

 

Other items include the following:

 

 

Our next goals are to begin scanning our document files and inventory files. We are open to suggestions on other documents that we should add to our website.

 

Morris the Cat 

Visits the Carlsbad Plaza Camino Real Mall

 

Shortly after the new Plaza Camino Real Mall opened, there were many promotional events that took place. For example, we found this photograph of Morris the Cat in the black and white negatives that were donated to the Carlsbad Historical Society by the North County Times.

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Carlsbad Historical Society

P.O. Box 252 Carlsbad CA 92018-0252

(760) 434-9189

cbadhistory@gmail.com

 

Shipley-Magee House

258 Beech Avenue Carlsbad CA 92008

 

Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday 11 to 3 pm.

Private Tours with Tea are given

Monday through Thursday

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

www.carlsbadhistoricalsociety.com

 

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Q4 2019 Newsletter

LINK here

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